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Nurses Month Week 2

ANA Enterprise 2020 Initiatives / Nurses Month Week 2
Nurses Month Week Two: Recognition

We dedicate the second week of Nurses Month to recognizing nurses past and present. On Monday, May 11 is Remembrance Day as we take a moment from our day to honor our health heroes – nurses and health care workers who have passed away during the COVID-19 pandemic. Tuesday is the 200th Anniversary of Florence Nightingale’s birth. Get to know the founder of modern medicine better through our interactive activities commemorating her accomplishments. Think you know her already, take our trivia quiz and find out! During Week 2, you can also read first-hand accounts from nurses working on the frontlines, what motivates them to continue to serve their patients, and what the profession means to them. You will also be able to see the faces of nursing through the amazing photographs they have submitted from around the world. Feeling inspired? submit your own story or photo to our gallery. Do you have a tribute you would like to share about a special nurse or just wish to recognize nurses in general? Complete the form on our recognition page and feel the love we have for nurses from the posts submitted by other visitors. Our second week is packed with activities, stories and tributes to commemorate all that nurses and the nursing profession has done for health care.

A Birthday Celebration

“Nursing is a progressive art such that to stand still is to go backwards.” – Florence Nightingale

As we honor the 200th anniversary of Florence Nightingale we revisit her story to remind us all just how much each of our own contributions can mean. Never forget, from the smallest light can come the greatest of inspirations!

Florence Nightingale is born into a
wealthy British family in Florence,
Italy, and is named for the city
of her birth. However, she grows
up in her family’s many homes in
England. We commemorate her
200th birthday this year.

In November of 1854, Nightingale arrives with a team of 38
women volunteer nurses and fifteen Catholic nuns at military
barracks in Istanbul to care for wounded British soldiers
fighting the Crimean War. Appalled by the poor conditions
of the camp, she writes a plea to The Times newspaper. The
British government sends a prefabricated hospital that ends
up having a death rate of 1/10th that of the original camp.
Nightingale gains the nickname during the Crimean
War from a phrase in a report from The Times
newspaper, which reads in part:

“When all the medical officers have retired for
the night and silence and darkness have settled
down upon those miles of prostrate sick, she may
be observed alone, with a little lamp in her hand,
making her solitary rounds.”
Lady with the lamp

In 1858, Florence Nightingale creates a
diagram entitled “Diagram of the Causes of
Mortality in the Army of the East,” showing
how disease and unsanitary conditions were
responsible for more deaths than battlefield
wounds. The graphic, easy to understand and
persuasive in demonstrating information, is
used today and known as the “Rose Diagram”
due to its a appearance of an open rose.

In 1858, Florence Nightingale becomes the first
female admitted to the Royal Statistical Society.
She believed that good data was essential to
understanding the impact and effectiveness of
health care and sanitary provision.
Hear a recording of Florence Nightingale’s voice (recorded 1890).
On July 9, 1860, Nightingale opens
up a nurse training school at St.
Thomas hospital in central London
using funds raised by the public.
Graduates were called “Nightingales.”
In 1999, the school was renamed
the Florence Nightingale School of
Nursing and Midwifery.
In 1893, the Florence Nightingale Pledge is created by Lystra Gretta and a committee of nurses in
Detroit, MI. US nurses recite the pledge at pinning ceremonies upon graduation.

Read the original and modern versions of the pledge side by side.
The Pledge

Florence Nightingale is
born into a wealthy British
family in Florence, Italy, and
is named for the city of her
birth. However, she grows up in
her family’s many homes in
England. We commemorate
her 200th birthday this year.

In November of 1854, Nightingale
arrives with a team of 38 women
volunteer nurses and fifteen
Catholic nuns at military barracks
in Istanbul to care for wounded
British soldiers fighting the
Crimean War. Appalled by the poor
conditions of the camp, she writes
a plea to The Times newspaper.
The British government sends a
prefabricated hospital that ends
up having a death rate of 1/10th
that of the original camp.
Nightingale gains the
nickname during the Crimean
War from a phrase in a report
from The Times newspaper,
which reads in part:

“When all the medical officers
have retired for the night and
silence and darkness have
settled down upon those
miles of prostrate sick, she
may be observed alone, with
a little lamp in her hand,
making her solitary rounds.”
Lady with the lamp

In 1858, Florence Nightingale
creates a diagram entitled
“Diagram of the Causes of
Mortality in the Army of the
East,” showing how disease
and unsanitary conditions
were responsible for more
deaths than battlefield
wounds. The graphic, easy to
understand and persuasive in
demonstrating information, is
used today and known as the
“Rose Diagram” due to its
appearance of an open rose.

In 1858, Florence Nightingale
becomes the first female
admitted to the Royal
Statistical Society. She
believed that good data was
essential to understanding
the impact and effectiveness
of health care and sanitary
provision.
Hear a recording of Florence
Nightingale’s voice (recorded 1890).
On July 9, 1860, Nightingale
opens up a nurse training
school at St. Thomas hospital
in central London using
funds raised by the public.
Graduates were called
“Nightingales.” In 1999, the
school was renamed the
Florence Nightingale School
of Nursing and Midwifery.
In 1893, the Florence
Nightingale Pledge is
created by Lystra Gretta
and a committee of nurses
in Detroit, MI. US nurses
recite the pledge at pinning
ceremonies upon graduation.

Read the original and modern
versions of the pledge
side by side.
The Pledge

Hear an audio recording of Florence Nightingale.

This sound recording is a copy made from the original brown wax cylinder on behalf of Wellcome Library by the British Library (18th March, 2004) featuring the voice of Florence Nightingale recorded on 30 July 1890.

The Nightingale Pledge

See how the pledge has evolved over the years …

Original Pledge (1893)

I solemnly pledge myself before God and in the presence of this assembly to pass my life in purity and to practise my profession faithfully.

I shall abstain from whatever is deleterious and mischievous, and shall not take or knowingly administer any harmful drug.

I shall do all in my power to maintain and elevate the standard of my profession and will hold in confidence all personal matters committed to my keeping and all family affairs coming to my knowledge in the practice of
my calling.

I shall be loyal to my work and devoted towards the welfare of those committed to my care.

Modern Pledge (since 1999)

Before God and those assembled here, I solemnly pledge;

To adhere to the code of ethics of the nursing profession;

To co-operate faithfully with the other members of the nursing team and to carryout faithfully and to the best of my ability the instructions of the physician or the nurse who may be assigned to supervise my work;

I will not do anything evil or malicious and I will not knowingly give any harmful drug or assist in malpractice.

I will not reveal any confidential information that may come to my knowledge in the course of my work.

And I pledge myself to do all in my power to raise the standards and prestige of the practical nursing;

May my life be devoted to service and to the high ideals of the nursing profession.

Original Pledge (1893)

I solemnly pledge myself before God and in the presence of this assembly to pass my life in purity and to practise my profession faithfully.

I shall abstain from whatever is deleterious and mischievous, and shall not take or knowingly administer any harmful drug.

I shall do all in my power to maintain and elevate the standard of my profession and will hold in confidence all personal matters committed to my keeping and all family affairs coming to my knowledge in the practice of my calling.

I shall be loyal to my work and devoted towards the welfare of those committed to my care.

Modern Pledge (since 1999)

Before God and those assembled here, I solemnly pledge;

To adhere to the code of ethics of the nursing profession;

To co-operate faithfully with the other members of the nursing team and to carryout faithfully and to the best of my ability the instructions of the physician or the nurse who may be assigned to supervise my work;

I will not do anything evil or malicious and I will not knowingly give any harmful drug or assist in malpractice.

I will not reveal any confidential information that may come to my knowledge in the course of my work.

And I pledge myself to do all in my power to raise the standards and prestige of the practical nursing;

May my life be devoted to service and to the high ideals of the nursing profession.

Flo Says What?

Practical advice by a sensible woman.

“A human being does not cease to exist at death. It is change, not destruction, which takes place.”

“Do not engage in any paper wars. You will convince nobody and arrive at no satisfaction yourself.”

“Wise and humane management of the patient is the best safeguard against infection.”

“Averages… seduce us away from minute observation.”

“The very first requirement in a hospital is that it should do the sick no harm.”

“I think one’s feelings waste themselves in words, they ought all to be distilled into actions and into actions which bring results.”

Think You Know Flo?

Take the ANA Florence Nightingale Quiz and find out!